Fishing Reports and Forecasts (2024)

June 16, 2020 | Agency

Fishing Reports and Forecasts (1)

Ohio offers many fantastic locations for the public to fish, including 124,000 acres of inland water, 7,000 miles of streams, 2.25 million acres of Lake Erie water, and 481 miles of the Ohio River.Use the fishing reports and forecasts below to help you plan for fishing success!

Other helpful resources we haveavailable includelake maps,fishing tips by species, andthe online interactive fishing map that allows you to select featuresto customize your own fishing maps for Ohio’s inland lakes.

Be sure to check back, more information is coming soon!

Lake Erie

The following is the Lake Erie Fishing Report filed by the ODNR-Division of Wildlife on 6/28/2024.

  • The daily limit for walleye in Ohio waters of Lake Erie is 6 fish per angler. The minimum size limit for walleye is 15 inches.
  • The daily limit for yellow perch is 30 in the West and East Zones of Ohio waters of Lake Erie. The daily limit is 10 in the Central Zone of Ohio waters of Lake Erie.
  • The trout and salmon daily limit is 5 fish per angler. The minimum size limit is 12 inches.
  • Black bass (largemouth and smallmouth bass): The daily limit is 5 fish per angler with a 14-inch minimum size limit.

      Walleye are being caught suspended in open water as many large walleye migrate east, although some anglers are still seeing success within a few miles of the shore. In the Western Basin, anglers are catching walleye north of West Sister Island near the Canadian line in 28-30’ of water, near Little Cedar Point in 10-15’ of water, and near Marblehead and Port Clinton in 20’ of water. In the Central Basin, limits are being caught near the Lorain dump, around Cleveland in 45-55’ of water, or out of Ashtabula in 74’ of water. Trollers are doing well with jerkbaits like bandits, spoons pulled behind divers or worm harnesses mostly 100-125’ back around 2.5 mph. Casting with worm harnesses has also been successful. The majority of kept walleye are 16-20’’ long, but 20’’+ fish are also common. Remember the daily limit is 6 fish, with a minimum size of 15 inches.

      Smallmouth and largemouth bass are being caught as they transition from spawning areas to deeper water. Protected bays and harbors, as well as deeper rocky substrates, should have good numbers of fish, especially around the Bass Islands, Kelleys Island, and in Central Basin harbors. Suspending jerkbaits and soft plastics like ned rigs, drop shots and tubes are the best baits. Remember the current daily limit for smallmouth and largemouth bass is five fish over 14 inches.

      The water temperature off Toledo is 75 degrees, off Cleveland 70 degrees, and off Erie 73 degrees.

      Anglers are encouraged to always wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device while on the water.

      Sandusky River and Maumee River Fishing Reports (Updated 4/8/24)

      Fishing Report for the Walleye and White Bass runs in the Maumee and Sandusky Rivers.

      Still many Walleye in the river. Spawning is at the peak and anglers are catching limits of fish. Some White Bass are being caught. Crossing to Bluegrass Island is not permitted currently.Still a large number of Walleye in the river. Some White Bass are being caught.White Street, Orleans and the Tow Path are the best locations at these water levels.
      Maumee River Sandusky River
      Water Temperature 56°F 57°F
      Water Levels High water normal level
      USGS Water Level Gage Data Maumee River at Waterville OH - USGS Water Data for the Nation Sandusky River Near Fremont OH - USGS Water Data for the Nation
      Fishing Activity Still many Walleye in the river. Spawning is at the peak and anglers are catching limits of fish. Some White Bass are being caught. Crossing to Bluegrass Island is not permitted currently. Still a large number of Walleye in the river. Some White Bass are being caught.
      Best Areas White Street, Orleans and the Tow Path are the best locations at these water levels. Ballville Dam Rd. Bridge and River Cliff Park and Hayes Ave. Bridge.
      Fishing Forecast Anglers can expect a lot of fish to be in the river for the next few weeks. River levels and temperature indicate we are at or just past the peak. should be near the peak of the run. River conditions should improve through the week as the water level drops. We are past the peak of the walleye run. White Bass fishing will continue to get better.
      Fishing Gear Carolina rig with 18 – 24” leader with a floating jig. Tip jig with a twister tail (white, yellow, and fluorescent colors are popular). Size of sinker will depend on water flow (1/4 oz. – 5/8 oz. sinker). Carolina rig with 18 – 24” leader with a floating jig. Tip jig with a twister tail (white, yellow, and fluorescent colors are popular). Size of sinker will depend on water flow (1/4 oz. – 5/8 oz. sinker)
      Fishing Regulations
      • Walleye: 15-inch min. length, 6 fish daily bag limit
      • White Bass: No limits
      • Black Bass: possession is limited to 1 fish 18" or greater in the Lake Erie zone from May 1 - June 21, 2024.
      • Walleye: 15-inch min. length, 6 fish daily bag limit
      • White Bass: No limits
      • Black Bass: possession is limited to 1 fish 18" or greater in the Lake Erie zone from May 1 - June 24, 2024.
      Special Regulations
      • Single hook only from 3/1-4/30
      • Sunrise to sunset fishing onlyin the special regulation areas
      • Single hook only from 3/1-4/30
      • Sunrise to sunset fishing only
      • Anglers are reminded that Lake Erie fishing regulations apply in the Sandusky River up to the Waterworks Dam in Tiffin.

      Lake Erie Steelhead Fishing

      Where to Catch Steelhead

      There are many public access areas on Ohio streams. If you are on private property, you must have landowner permission. Don't trespass! Private landowners have the right to restrict access on their property. In Ohio, you can gain access to the stream from public access points, but private land ownership includes their land under the stream. Many of our main steelhead streams listed above are navigable streams, meaning you can float a boat through them to fish; however, you cannot get out of your boat and stand on private property to fish unless you have the landowner's permission. See the river and stream access maps link below for public access areas available.

      Ohio’s Steelhead Program

      The Division of Wildlife annually stocks selected Lake Erie tributary streams with 7-8" yearling steelhead. These fish (called "smolts") migrate out into Lake Erie and spend the summer in the cooler part of the lake before returning to streams during the fall through the spring. Steelhead trout caught by anglers in the streams typically average 25" long and weigh 5-6 pounds. These fish have usually spent 2-3 summers out in the lake (see growth chart below). However, there are a good number of fish that are over 30 inches and weigh more than 10 pounds and have spent as many as five summers in the lake.

      Eggs are procured each spring from egg-taking operations in Michigan by the Michigan DNR (Little Manistee strain) and in Wisconsin by the Wisconsin DNR (Chambers Creek and Ganaraska strains). The steelhead strains we use are proven in Lake Erie and provide steelhead runs in our tributaries from fall through spring. Eggs are raised at our Castalia State Fish Hatchery for around 11-12 months to the yearling stage, averaging 7-8" at release.

      Ohio's primary steelhead streams are Vermilion, Rocky, Chagrin, Grand and Ashtabula rivers and Conneaut Creek. The Rocky, Chagrin and Grand rivers are scheduled to each receive 90,000 yearling steelhead annually. Conneaut Creek is scheduled to receive 75,000 fish from Ohio and 75,000 fish from the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission each spring. The Vermilion River is scheduled to receive 55,000 steelhead annually. The Ashtabula River has begun to receive annual steelhead releases, now that water quality and habitat has improved. Total targeted annual stocking numbers projected from Ohio's Castalia State Fish Hatchery is around 450,000 steelhead.

      Several other rivers including the Cuyahoga, Huron and Black rivers, and Arcola, Cowles, Wheeler, French, Euclid, Turkey, Beaver and Cold creeks get runs of stray steelhead. While Ohio Division of Wildlife fisheries biologists have noted a small amount of natural reproduction, it varies greatly from year-to-year. It is too low and erratic to support the quality fishery that has been developed and that anglers have come to expect. Good quantities of cold, spring water and adequate juvenile trout habitat are also rare in NE Ohio's Lake Erie tributaries. The fantastic fishing has been maintained by annual stocking and by the practice of most anglers to catch and release.

      Recent Stocking Numbers (Yearlings)

      STREAM 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
      Ashtabula - 41,940 69,928 55,870 50,294 56,686 53,313
      Chagrin 96,680 90,036 90,008 109,285 90,756 92,221 93,169
      Conneaut 75,019 75,092 75,079 75,021 75,116 81,966 80,777
      Grand 95,512 90,035 90,076 99,448 90,584 81,966 90,169
      Rocky 90,069 90,038 90,114 96,576 97,969 100,532 94,530
      Vermilion 56,045 55,087 63,203 73,645 64,546 65,453 58,954
      TOTAL 413,325 442,228 478,408 509,845 469,265 498,972 470,912

      How to Catch Steelhead

      Typical set-ups are long (7-10'), limber, spinning or fly rods with light line (4-8 lb. test). Common lures in the fall, early winter, and again in the spring include small (1/16 to 1/80 oz.) marabou or synthetic hair jigs tipped with maggots rigged with split shot under a light pencil-thin bobber.

      Spoons (Little Cleo, KO Wobblers, etc.) and spinners (Rooster Tails, Vibrax, etc.) are commonly used on piers, beaches and lower stream reaches. These lures and other hard-bait minnow-imitating lures can also be trolled in harbors, lower river, and nearshore lake locations early and late in the season.

      Flyfishers (using 6-9 wt. rods and weight-forward lines) prefer larger, weighted fly patterns, such as nymphs and streamers like woolly buggers, princes, egg-sucking leeches, stonefly and shiner patterns and Clouser minnows.

      Egg fly patterns (single or cluster, sucker spawn, etc.) work well as a single fly or in tandem with a nymph or streamer once the fish move upstream. Salmon or trout eggs are fished as either individual eggs or grouped together in mesh "spawn bags" about the size of a dime or nickel. Eggs can be bounced along the bottom with the current or fished at or near the bottom suspended under a bobber.

      The fish will be oriented to cover or moderate to deep water pools in the fall and move into cuts or gravel runs as they make their way upstream for spawning. As stream temperatures warm during the spring, expect fish to be more likely to chase flies, lures or bait and to be found in riffles and runs. Then in mid-April through mid-May, they move back downstream and into Lake Erie for the summer.

      Steelhead Growth

      YEARS IN LAKE AVERAGE LENGTH (INCHES) AVERAGE WEIGHT (POUNDS)
      1 17 2-3
      2 23 4-5
      3 26 6-7
      4 28 8-10

      Related Links

      Central Ohio (District 1)

      Regional Lake Comparisons

      Survey Results

      • Channel Catfish Lake Comparisons
      • Crappie Lake Comparisons
      • Largemouth Bass Lake Comparisons
      • Saugeye Lake Comparisons

      Stocking Results

      • Blue Catfish 5-year Stockings
      • Channel Catfish 5-year Stockings
      • Hybrid-Striped Bass 5-year Stockings
      • Muskellunge 5-year Stockings
      • Rainbow Trout 5-year Stockings
      • Saugeye 5-year Stockings
      • Yellow Perch 5-year Stockings

      Central Ohio Lakes

      Alum Creek Lake

      Fishing Forecast

      Recent bass surveys have shown a strong year class of largemouth bass hatched in 2016. This should provide anglers with good numbers of “keeper” fish in the 13-16 inch range. Alum Creek continues to provide some of the best smallmouth bass fishing in the state with many fish in the 10-14 inch range and numerous bigger fish reaching 5-6lbs. Excellent survival of saugeye stocked in 2017 has led to an abundance of larger fish in the 17-20 inch range. Even better survival of saugeye stocked in 2019 will result in increased catches of “short” fish under 15 inches in 2020. However, this year class of fish will continue to provide good numbers of keepers for the next few years. Alum Creek continues to produce good numbers and sizes of crappie, with recent trap net surveys resulting in the best catch rate of crappie over 11 inches in the last ten years. Numbers were above average for the lake but below district and statewide averages, which is common in larger, deeper lakes where trap nets don’t fish as efficiently as they do in smaller, shallower lakes. Hoop net surveys showed channel catfish numbers similar to other area lakes with many fish in the 15-20 inch range. Muskie continue to be stocked annually. The best opportunities for anglers to catch these trophy fish are usually May through July in the reservoir and March through April in the spillway. In addition, Alum Creek has an excellent white bass population which can be targeted by anglers in the upstream portions of the reservoir during their spawning run in May or throughout the main basin from late summer through the fall when they congregate to chase large schools of shad.

      Fish Stockings

      • Alum Creek Muskellunge Stocking
      • Alum Creek Saugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Alum Creek Channel Catfish Survey
      • Alum Creek Crappie Survey
      • Alum Creek Largemouth Bass Survey
      • Alum Creek Saugeye Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Alum Creek Angler Survey


      Delaware Lake

      Fishing Forecast

      Delaware Lake is primarily known for its excellent crappie population. Consistent reproduction by both black and white crappie have led to good numbers of both species. Results from annual trap net surveys indicate a large proportion of fish over nine inches, especially for black crappie in recent years. Angler catch rates are above average, and crappie tournament results have produced fish that average one pound at weigh-ins. Delaware continues to be a popular destination for bass anglers and tournaments. Electrofishing numbers of largemouth bass have trended down the last five years but there’s still good numbers of fish, mostly in the 12-15 inch range. In 2018, catfish hoop net surveys produced a catch rate of channel catfish that was three times the statewide average and the highest in central Ohio. Despite these large numbers, the size structure was relatively small with approximately three quarters of the catfish sampled less than 15 inches. Delaware Lake also has decent populations of bluegill and white bass that can be caught in good numbers during different times of the year.

      Fish Surveys

      • Delaware Channel Catfish Survey
      • Delaware Crappie Survey
      • Delaware Largemouth Bass Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Delaware Angler Survey


      Hoover Reservoir

      Fishing Forecast

      Hoover Reservoir is home to a wide diversity of sport fishes that are commonly targeted by anglers. Regarded as one of the best catfishing lakes in the state, it boasts great populations of channel, flathead, and blue catfish. Blue catfish were first stocked in 2011 and have survived and grown very well in the reservoir since then. Growth rates are quite variable but some of the older individuals are already reaching weights of over thirty pounds. The saugeye population has rebounded nicely after several consecutive years with poor survival of stocked fish. Average to above average stocking success since 2017 has led to a robust population with many sizes of fish ranging from 10-20 inches. In addition, Hoover received a stocking of walleye in 2019 for the first time in over thirty years. This is part of a three-year study comparing the survival, growth, and angler catches of walleye and saugeye in Hoover. The reservoir is also known for its great crappie population. Both black and white crappie can be found in large numbers, with trap net surveys showing an even proportion of fish above and below the nine-inch minimum length limit. Good numbers of bluegill are also found in Hoover and typically reach lengths of 7-8 inches. Both largemouth and smallmouth bass inhabit the reservoir, although largemouth are much more abundant. Most bass sampled are between 12-18 inches, but excellent growth rates of both species provide anglers with good opportunities to catch largemouth and smallmouth bass over twenty inches. Hoover also has a large white bass population that can provide great fishing opportunities during their spring spawning run up Big Walnut Creek in the spring or throughout the year when schooled up chasing shad. Many Fish Ohio sized white bass (>14”) are caught by anglers in Hoover every year.

      Fish Stockings

      • Hoover Blue Catfish Stocking
      • Hoover Walleye Stocking
      • Hoover Saugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Hoover Channel Catfish Survey
      • Hoover Crappie Survey
      • Hoover Largemouth Bass Survey
      • Hoover Saugeye Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Hoover Angler Survey


      Indian Lake

      Fishing Forecast

      Indian Lake is one of Ohio’s best saugeye lakes based on angler reports and gill net surveys. Consistent survival and excellent growth of stocked fish in this shallow and extremely productive lake have led to good numbers and sizes of saugeye available to anglers. Currently, there is an abundance of age-2 saugeye from an extremely successful 2018 stocking. Many of these fish will be over the 15-inch minimum size limit by early summer 2020 and could reach close to 18 inches by late fall. The crappie fishery has also done very well in recent years with a large population of both black and white crappie over nine inches. Not just a numbers lake, Indian provides anglers with a great chance at catching very large crappie in the 14-16 inch range. Largemouth bass have done well with the abundant shallow water habitat and vegetation at Indian Lake. There are good numbers of fish, although the large majority are under 15 inches. Indian Lake is one of the best bluegill fisheries in central Ohio and is one of the few lakes where anglers can consistently catch fish over eight inches. Approximately half of the channel catfish caught in the most recent hoop net surveys were exactly eight years old, with most falling in the 18-20 inch category. Because of their long life span, these catfish should continue to grow and remain in good numbers for years to come. To complement the channel catfish population, the naturally occurring flathead catfish population has continued to grow over the past decade with numerous fish in the 20-30 pound range caught by anglers every year. White bass are also abundant in Indian Lake and are often caught incidentally by anglers targeting other species. They can be targeted during the spring though, when they make a spawning run up the South Fork of the Great Miami River near the Moundwood access.

      Fish Stockings

      • Indian Lake Saugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Indian Lake Channel Catfish Survey
      • Indian Lake Crappie Survey
      • Indian Lake Largemouth Bass Survey
      • Indian Lake Saugeye Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Indian Lake Angler Survey

      Northwest Ohio (District 2)

      Regional Lake Comparisons

      Survey Results

      • Channel Catfish Lake Comparisons
      • Crappie Lake Comparisons
      • Hybrid Striped Bass Lake Comparisons
      • Largemouth Bass Lake Comparisons
      • SmallmouthBass Lake Comparisons
      • Saugeye Lake Comparisons
      • Walleye Lake Comparisons
      • Yellow Perch Lake Comparisons


      Northeast Ohio (District 3)

      Northeast Ohio Lakes

      Berlin Lake

      Fish Stockings

      • Berlin Lake Walleye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Berlin Lake Channel Catfish Survey
      • Berlin Lake Crappie Survey
      • Berlin Lake Largemouth Bass Survey
      • Berlin Lake Smallmouth Bass Survey
      • Berlin Lake Walleye Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Berlin Lake Angler Survey


      Southeast Ohio (District 4)

      Regional Lake Comparisons

      Survey Results

      • Channel Catfish Lake Comparisons
      • Crappie Lake Comparisons
      • Largemouth Bass Lake Comparisons
      • Saugeye Lake Comparisons
      • Smallmouth Bass Lake Comparisons

      Stocking Results

      • Blue Catfish 5-year Stockings
      • Bluegill 5-year Stockings
      • Brown Trout 5-year Stockings
      • Channel Catfish 5-year Stockings
      • Grass Carp 5-year Stockings
      • Hybrid-Striped Bass 5-year Stockings
      • Muskellunge 5-year Stockings
      • Rainbow Trout 5-year Stockings
      • Saugeye 5-year Stockings
      • Yellow Perch 5-year Stockings

      Southeast Ohio Lakes

      Burr Oak

      Fishing Forecast

      Recent fish surveys show a good distribution of Largemouth Bass sizes from 3 to 23 inches and has been a consistent producer of fish over 18 inches. Surveys also show a very stable population that consistently put it as one of the top bass lakes in the area. Sunfish are typically small here with most fish in the 5 to 6 inches range with few fish reaching 8 inches. White Crappie are the dominate crappie species in the lake but Black Crappie are present in lower numbers. Most crappie are in the 7 to 8 inch range but fish over 15 inches are caught every year. Channel Catfish numbers are average compared to area lakes with sizes from 10 to 25 inches with good numbers between 15 and 20 inches. Flathead Catfish are occasionally caught here too.

      Structure Coordinates

      • Burr Oak Structure Coordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Burr Oak Channel CatfishStocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Burr Oak Channel Catfish Survey
      • Burr Oak Crappie Survey
      • Burr Oak Largemouth Bass Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Burr Oak Angler Survey


      Lake Rupert

      Structure Coordinates

      • Lake Rupert Structure Coordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Lake Rupert Channel Catfish Stocking
      • Lake Rupert Saugeye Stocking
      • Lake Rupert Grass Carp Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Lake Rupert Channel Catfish Survey
      • Lake Rupert Crappie Survey
      • Lake Rupert Largemouth Bass Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Lake Rupert Angler Survey


      Piedmont Lake

      Structure Coordinates

      • Piedmont Lake Structure Coordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Piedmont Lake Muskellunge Stocking
      • Piedmont Lake Saugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Piedmont Lake Crappie Survey
      • Piedmont Lake Largemouth Bass Survey
      • Piedmont Lake Smallmouth Bass Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Piedmont Lake Angler Survey


      Salt Fork Lake

      Structure Coordinates

      • Salt ForkStructure Coordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Salt ForkMuskellunge Stocking
      • Salt ForkSaugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Salt ForkCrappie Survey
      • Salt ForkLargemouth Bass Survey
      • Salt ForkSmallmouth Bass Survey


      Seneca Lake

      Structure Coordinates

      • Seneca Lake Structure Coordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Seneca Lake Blue Catfish Stocking
      • Seneca LakeSaugeye Stocking
      • Seneca LakeStriped Bass Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Seneca LakeCrappie Survey
      • Seneca LakeLargemouth Bass Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Seneca LakeAngler Survey


      Southwest Ohio (District 5)

      Regional Lake Comparisons

      Survey Results

      • Channel Catfish Lake Comparisons
      • Crappie Lake Comparisons
      • Largemouth Bass Lake Comparisons
      • Saugeye Lake Comparisons

      Stocking Results

      • Blue Catfish 5-year Stockings
      • ChannelCatfish5-yearStockings
      • Hybrid-Striped Bass 5-year Stockings
      • Muskellunge5-yearStockings
      • RainbowTrout5-yearStockings
      • Saugeye 5-year Stockings
      • Walleye 5-year Stockings
      • Yellow Perch 5-year Stockings

      Southwest Ohio Lakes

      Acton Lake

      Fishing Forecast

      Recent fish surveys continue to show a robust population of largemouth bass of all sizes, with fish ranging from 4 to 22 inches and up to 15 years old. Crappie populations have improved with the removal of the 9 inch length limit and 30 fish bag limit. Both the growth rates and overall length of surveyed fish have improved. White crappie dominate the system. Saugeye grow well in Acton, with fish reaching 23 inches in 3 years. Bluegill size and numbers have improved in recent years with some fish reaching 8 ½ inches. Acton is an unlimited horsepower lake, but for motors larger than 10 hp, it is idle only.

      Structure Coordinates

      • Acton Lake Structure Coordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Acton Lake Saugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Acton Lake Catfish Survey
      • Acton Lake Crappie Survey
      • Acton Lake Saugeye Survey
      • ActonLakeLargemouthBassSurvey

      Angler Survey

      • ActonLakeAnglerSurvey


      C.J. Brown Lake

      Fishing Forecast

      Clarence J. Brown Reservoir located at Buck Creek State Park continues to be a premiere inland walleye destination. The abundance of gizzard shad allows for incredibly fast growth of sportfish and most of the lake is open water habitat, with very few bays or coves. Walleye grow to 15 inches in 1.5 years and exceed 20 inches in 2.5 years. Catching a walleye over 10 pounds is possible, especially in fall through early spring. Largemouth and smallmouth bass have good populations and sizes within the lake, while crappie populations are not strong in size or number, they may be found throughout the lake. Bluegill sunfish grow well at C.J., along with several other sunfish species like longear and green sunfish. Muskellunge have recently been added to the stocking list for C.J. Brown, with early results suggesting great survival and growth. On a windy day, the lake can be quite a challenge with few places to shelter from wind and wave…but the main boat ramp and the marina are both well protected from the weather and offer great places to launch or store your boat.

      Structure Coordinates

      • C.J.BrownStructureCoordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • C.J. BrownMuskellunge Stocking
      • C.J. Brown Walleye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • C.J. Brown Crappie Survey
      • C.J. Brown Largemouth Bass Survey
      • C.J. Brown Walleye Survey

      Angler Survey

      • C.J. Brown Angler Survey


      Caeser Creek Lake

      Fishing Forecast

      Caesar Creek is the deepest lake in Ohio, with depths over 100 feet at the dam and features a complex shoreline of steep drop offs, shallow bays and lots of structure. Largemouth and smallmouth bass are found in good numbers throughout the lake, with fish over 22 inches possible. Crappie continue to do well in Caesar, with fish reaching 11 inches in 4 years. Saugeye continue to flourish in Caesar Creek, with excellent numbers and sizes. Muskellunge have been stocked since 1998 with excellent survival and growing rapidly to over 40 inches. The newest addition to the lake is blue catfish, first stocked in 2018 and showing good survival and fast growth. Blues are a prized native sportfish with the potential to exceed 100 pounds. Caesar Creek has a newer marina to serve boaters on the lake with multiple annual rental slips and a gas dock.

      Structure Coordinates

      • CaesarCreekStructureCoordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Caesar Creek Blue Catfish Stocking
      • Caesar Creek Muskellunge Stocking
      • Caesar Creek Saugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Caesar Creek Catfish Survey
      • Caesar Creek Crappie Survey
      • Caesar Creek Largemouth Bass Survey
      • Caesar Creek Saugeye Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Caesar Creek Angler Survey


      Cowan Lake

      Fishing Forecast

      The most recent largemouth bass survey at Cowan Lake indicates an excellent population for size and numbers. Catch Per Unit Effort (CPUE) with electrofishing gear was 226 bass per hour compared to the statewide average of 93. Largemouth ranged in size from 4 inches to 22 inches with fish up to 14 years old in the survey. Saugeye have been stocked in Cowan since 2001 and maintain a strong population with good numbers caught over 15 inches. Crappie continue to do very well in Cowan with good numbers and sizes of fish. With the recent addition of fish attractor structures, crappie anglers should continue to experience excellent fishing opportunities. Even with its smaller size, Cowan has a good population of large flathead catfish and a healthy channel catfish population. In the upper portions of the lake, large beds of water lotus and water lily may be found in the summertime.

      Structure Coordinates

      • Cowan Lake Structure Coordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Cowan LakeSaugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Cowan Lake Crappie Survey
      • Cowan Lake Largemouth Bass Survey
      • Cowan Lake Saugeye Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Cowan Lake Angler Survey


      Rocky Fork Lake

      Fishing Forecast

      Recent surveys at Rocky Fork Lake show a strong distribution of largemouth bass, with the majority ranging from 12 to 18 inches with fish up to 22 inches observed. On average it takes 3 years for a largemouth to reach 12 inches and 5 years for 15 inches. Rocky Fork also maintains an excellent population of both white and black crappie, with fish averaging 10 inches and up to 14 inches. Both channel and flathead catfish may be found in Rocky Fork with good numbers and sizes of each as well as an excellent population of large white bass. For those who like something different, Rocky Fork Lake is a great place to test your gear against common carp, there are good numbers in the lake and they grow in excess of 30 pounds. Rocky Fork also has submergent weed beds along the shoreline that help support sunfish and yellow perch populations.

      Structure Coordinates

      • Rocky Fork Structure Coordinates

      Fish Stockings

      • Rocky Fork Rainbow Trout Stocking
      • Rocky Fork Saugeye Stocking

      Fish Surveys

      • Rocky Fork Crappie Survey
      • RockyForkLargemouthBassSurvey
      • Rocky Fork Saugeye Survey

      Angler Survey

      • Rocky Fork Angler Survey


      Ohio Sport Fish Consumption Advisory

      Annual Advisory

      To protect the health of anyone who eats Ohio-caught fish, an annual advisory for how often these fish can be safely eaten is prepared by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA).

      View the most recentOhio Sport Fish Consumption Advisory.

      The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) manages an interactive map of fishing advisories in Ohio.

      Fishing Reports and Forecasts (2024)
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